Movies
Alphabetical Listing of Movies
A | B | D | E | F | H | I | J | K
L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | W


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Atlantis, 2001
Being a horrible animated and horribly written Disney cartoon like all of the rest complete with a “rainbow coalition” of cast members representing every imaginable nationality, there is only one reason to watch this film, and that is the subject matter. I don’t intend to take credit for this, bit it does appear that immediately after Boyd Rice and I announced our new twist on the Atlantean theory on Coast to Coast A.M. earlier this year, an explosion of Atlantis-themed TV shows and movies occurred in popular culture, perhaps all part of a shared zeitgeist. This film contains many elements of our own theories. For instance, Atlantis is, in the film, a still-existing kingdom occupied by living people, and it is located underneath the ocean floor, i.e., in the center of the Earth, guarded by a sea-monster called the Leviathan - all of which ties in with our theory. Secondly these inhabitants speak the original language from which all of the world’s languages derive, and thus these Atlanteans can understand all other languages as well. A character in the film even compares this to the “Tower of Babel.” This original language, represented by the Tower of Babel, is again a central element of our theory. Furthermore, the Atlantean city is powered by crystal energy derived from the capstone to the city’s pyramid temple. I too have theorized that the capstone on the Giza pyramid provided a similar form of “alternative energy.” Where the film parts way from our theory is in the depiction of the Atlanteans as primitive tribesmen wearing loincloths and worshipping malformed stone heads - not exactly the type of people you would picture building such a magnificent and technologically-advanced city. Nevertheless, the film is worth watching - just fast-forward through the icky parts.

Buy Atlantis on DVD at amazon.com, amazon.co.uk or amazon.ca.


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Atlantis: The Lost Continent, 1961
A Greek fisherman saves the life of a castaway Atlantean princess and ends up a slave in her home empire. He gains his freedom by overcoming a number of awesome gladiatorial challenges, and escapes with the Princess just moments before the continent meets its watery doom. One of the most notable elements of the film involves slaves whose bodies have been fused with that of a bull, to become “Beasts of Burden.”

Buy Atlantis: The Lost Continent at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Beauty and the Beast, 1946
Cocteau’s twist on the old fairy tale, replete with magic mirrors, divine horses, and tons of occult and Grail-related allegory. One of the final scenes takes place in the grove of the goddess Diana.

Buy Beauty and the Beast at amazon.com, or amazon.ca.


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Blood Junkies
You know what contemporary cinema is missing? Vampiric exiled Templars sucking the AIDS-tainted blood out of drug-addicted hospital patients. Check out Blood Junkies, a 16mm straight-to-video feature film by Writer/Director Bruce Naugthon. According to the advertisement posted on the internet, “Blood Junkies is the tale of a Scottish vampire, Sir Ruari McDorachas (Red Son of Darkness), the last of the Knights Templar who fought at Robert the Bruce’s side at the Battle of Bannockburn.” It is set in a modern smack-ridden Edinburgh ghetto, “and unlike the Trainspotting cast, says the director, “nobody had to teach my actors how to shoot up.” To follow the progress of this release, go to http://www.rundog.demon.co.uk/bloodjunkies.htm.
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Blood of a Poet, 1930
Jean Cocteau’s first and most bizarre film. Provides an “initiation” into his personal world of occult symbolism. Explores his signature symbol of the pentagram, and people who turn into statues.

Buy Blood of a Poet at amazon.com, or amazon.ca.


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The Brotherhood of the Bell, 1970
A newly-joined member of a secret society gets caught in a web of conspiracy when he refuses to blackmail one of his colleagues on behalf of the Brotherhood. He spends the rest of the film frantically trying to convince his family, friends, and the world that there really is a group of greedy white businessmen who conspire together to control everything.
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Dogma, 1999
A female descendant of Christ through Mary Magdalen called “The Last Scion” is given the responsibility of saving existence from a pair of fallen angels. Obviously, director Kevin Smith has been reading Holy Blood, Holy Grail, and perhaps Dagobert’s Revenge.

Buy Dogma on DVD at amazon.com, or amazon.ca.


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Eyes Wide Shut, 1999
Stanley Kubrick’s last film, so spooky, one can almost forgive him for casting Tom Cruise and that awful woman in the lead. The storyline involves a secret society of rich and powerful men who meet secretly in cloaks, hoods and masks to commit sexual debauchery with masked prostitutes amid chanting and candlelight. Clearly based on Bohemian Grove, the occult related secret sex club for the rich and powerful that really does exist, causing one to wonder if Mr. Kubrick’s death was entirely natural.

Buy Eyes Wide Shut on DVD at amazon.com, or amazon.ca.


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From Beyond, 1986
Based on the H.P. Lovecraft story about a man whose mind is opened up to new dimensions, and the abominable creatures that inhabit them, when his friend invents a machine that enlarges the Third Eye, or pineal gland. Soon the man is violently sex-crazed and uncontrollably driven to eat brains, making his pineal gland grow even larger.

And of course, we recommend all of the other movies based on Lovecraft stories: In the Mouth of Madness, The Necronomicon, Haunter of the Dark, The Dunwich Horror, Cthulhu Mansion, The Evil Dead, The Evil Dead II, army of Darkness, The Unnamable, The Re-Animator, etc., not because they’re particularly good, but because Lovecraft is so brilliant.

Buy From Beyond at amazon.com.


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From Hell, 2001
Based on the comic book by Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell, this film reveals “Jack the Ripper” to have been a rouge Freemason with close ties to the crown, asked the Lodge to cover up the ugly matter of a bastard son to the Crown Prince, mothered by a prostitute from Whitechapel. However, the Freemasons in charge of the City of London (including Scotland Yard) could not have predicted how far he would take his assignment, committing a series of Masonic ritual murders with a severity and brutality unprecedented in 19th Century England. All they know now is that they must cover it up, as a Scotland Yard detective (played by Johnny Depp) discovers when he tries to investigate the case. In the end, the murderer is himself ritually punished in the same manner as the Masonic Grand Master Hiram Abiff - with three head wounds inflicted by a mallet, resulting, effectively, in brain-death. This is one of the best movies ever, regardless of the rich Masonic content, and all DR readers must see it.

Buy From Hell on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
I first heard about the Harry Potter phenomenon through a friend that happens to also be a school teacher. A year or so ago she told me about these books that all the kids were reading and that I, an occult-minded soul, might actually like picking one up for a light, yet enjoyable read. I never did though. In the end, what made me finally want to see this movie was the vociferous opinions of the many fundamentalist Christians who felt that the books and the resulting first movie from the seven part series were actually driving young souls into the warm, prickly, pock-marked arms of the Devil himself. If something is so terrible that a fundy x-tian has to burn it or picket it, then I am there, and thank the Lord for heavy handed Christian propaganda for eventually getting my carcass into the theater seat.

Harry Potter is the tale of a young orphan boy whose parents were mysteriously killed. In his infancy, he goes to live with his only living relatives, who happen to be muggles (ordinary every day folk who discount magical thinking). In fact, Harry lives in such a mundane and dreary world until one day he is invited to attend the same school that his parents once attended, Hogwart's School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Incidentally, this school exists hidden away from the profane visions of the Muggle world, and is where eventually the movie begins to take form. It is here that Harry is indoctrinated into the world of potion making, broom riding, wand waving and all of the things that this sometimes entails. Along the way we learn more about what killed his parents, have a few adventures and meet a three-headed dog that is not named Cerberus, but is instead called Fluffy.

Admittedly this is light fare for the heavy handed occultist viewer, mainly aimed at the imaginations of pre-teens and above, but let's not forget the impact that this movie and others like it could have and have had in the past. The occult revival of the 1960's was somewhat due in part to Disney movies like Bell, Book and Candle, television shows like Bewitched and occult laden spoofs like Bedazzled. It wasn't soon afterwards that Wicca became an almost household name and tomes like the Satanic Bible and the Necronomicon began to fill everyday book store shelves. Perhaps Harry Potter will help stir the cauldron of another such revival, making serious occult topics once again more publicly acceptable. The secret society that Harry Potter joins and flourishes in may just be the first one that little Johnny might hear of, and perhaps it will make him more receptive to the second and third ones that he hears about. As well, any movie that mentions the name of a renown alchemist like Nicholas Flammel within it is hip in my book.

If you have got the extra money to go see this, then do. You'll have one more way of relating to the new upstarts that will soon be joining our occult related world and while you are there you just might like what the movie has to offer; incredible special effects, decent acting, and the occasional heart warming moment or two that is more centered on the love that is in children's hearts than what the pushers of original sin are preaching about this week from their bully pulpits.

Buy Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Hunger, 1983
A classic gothic vampire flick about an Egyptian vampire named Miriam (traditional title for a temple prostitute in the ancient world), starring out favorite - David Bowie - with an opening scene of one of our favorite bands, Bauhaus, performing their song, “Bela Lugosi’s Dead.”

Buy The Hunger on DVD at amazon.com.

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Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, 1989
The third in the Indiana Jones series, this one has our hero discovering the Holy Grail, still guarded by the ghost of King Arthur. Templar and Masonic allusions abound.

Buy Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade on DVD at amazon.com.

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The Invocation of My Demon Brother, 1969
Another great short film from Kenneth Anger depicting scenes from magical rituals, with an appearance from Anton LaVey who plays the part of Satan. Also includes a mesmerizing tape loop soundtrack by Mick Jagger, and the award-winning line: “Zap! You’re pregnant. That’s witchcraft.”
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JFK, 1991
Starring Freemason Kevin Costner, this film explains the Kennedy assassination conspiracy theory from the point of view of Attorney Jim Garrison. A host of purported “subliminal Masonic messages” have been found in this film, as reported in the article “Subliminal Masonic Messages in Oliver Stone’s Movie JFK”, from Dagobert’s Revenge, Vol. 2#1. Overt Masonic images can be found in Stone’s films U-Turn and Natural Born Killers as well.

Buy JFK on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Journey to the Center of the Earth, 1959
Without a doubt the best Hollow Earth movie ever made, based on the book by Jules Verne (another author who seems to have been clued in on the Rennes-le-Chateau mystery.) Three explores, accompanied by a duck named Gertrude, race an evil madman to the center of the Earth, where they discover the lost continent of Atlantis, still peopled by a race of giants. These giants, it turns out, are the blood ancestors of the evil madman!

Buy Journey to the Center of the Earth on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.

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Jubilee, 1977
Adam Ant’s finest hour on the silver screen. John Dee and Queen Elizabeth I summon up the archangel Ariel from an Enochian tablet. The angel shows them a vision of a post-Apocalyptic future where anarchy reigns and thousands of unruly ‘70s punks roam the bombed-out ruins of the city of London. Includes some precious Cameos from Siouxsie Sioux and Wayne County.

Buy Jubilee at amazon.com.


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The Kingdom (a.k.a. Riget),1994
Directed by Lars von Trier, this bizarre Danish soap opera provided Denmark, Europe, and the world with two seasons of the most amazing material ever to be broadcast on television. The Kingdom, said to be the most technologically-advanced hospital in Denmark, was built upon a haunted graveyard which apparently contains an entrance to Hell. Strange goings-on begin to occur, including the impregnation of a young woman by a ghost, who seems to be identified with Lucifer himself. The baby is born with supernatural intelligence, and grows at an astronomical rate, but he is horribly deformed, a giant monster - somewhat like the race of monstrous giants called the Nephilim, who were said to be the spawn of human women and demonic fallen angels. One gets the feeling that that is exactly what director Lars von Trier is trying to imply. The hospital is dominated by a Masonic-like secret society called “The Lodge”, which provides the viewers many humorous scenes of them performing ridiculous rituals. Von Trier reveals the underlying Hermetic philosophy behind his show when he delivers a monologue at the end of each season reminding everyone to “take the good with the evil.”

Buy The Kingdom at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Lara Croft, Tomb Raider
I don't normally choose to go see movies that are spin-offs of video games, but certain friends of mine told me that this movie actually had subject matter that I would be interested in. Mainly, things that dealt with the Illuminati, and this alone was enough to at least get me in the seat to see what all the hoopla was about.

The Illuminati seems to be everywhere these days, especially in Hollywood. There's been a plethora of movies dealing with secret societies and their agendas that could lead a conspiracy theorist to believe that the mass public is having their consciousness seeded with Illuminati-like propaganda. While many of these movies are substance less, artless, and devoid of anything that I could call entertaining, it is interesting nonetheless that they keep hitting the big screen.

In this film we view a symbol, flashed at us constantly, which is almost exactly like the pyramid and all-seeing eye that we see on our dollar bills and within the AOL logo everyday. We also get references to the "People of the Light" and scenes of shadowy looking folks gathered in a chamber discussing arcane subjects like planetary alignments and "ancient cosmological models". We're also treated to William Blake quotes, explanations of Lucifer-like fallen meteors, plenty of talk about time travel, and scenes of the sun eclipsing that look somewhat similar to that of the black sun of the Thuleans. As well, one of the deleted scenes in the DVD version of this movie actually shows a ritual beheading, and members of the Illuminati giving each other Masonic handshakes. All pretty high-brow stuff considering that it is juxtaposed with tantalizing shots of Angelina Jolie's cleavage, scenes of her practically shaking her thang in the shower, endless unrealistic scenes of conflict, combat and gunplay, speeding motorcycles, and the latest electronic dance offerings of Fatboy Slim and the Chemical Brothers. All of which, in the end, make this no different from any other movie currently polluting the silver screens of America.

Buy Lara Croft, Tomb Raider on DVD at amazon.com, or amazon.ca.


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The Last Temptation of Christ, 1988
The controversial Scorcese that explores what might have happened if Christ had survived the crucifixion and gone on to wed Mary Magdalen - something that just so happens to be part of the central thesis of this magazine. Harvey Keitel as Judas and David Bowie as Pontius Pilate are almost worth seeing it in themselves.

Buy The Last Temptation of Christ on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Lord Of The Rings - The Fellowship Of The Ring
Seeking to depict British author, J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth mythos and The Lord of The Rings trilogy via the silver screen with charm and finesse would seem to be a task too large for any mere director to accomplish. To say that it would be an enormous undertaking would be an understatement. Thankfully, Peter Jackson's direction of this epic morality tale is one that does the demanding job more than adequately.

Sure, there were a few minor things that got on my nerves. For one, there's the line, uttered with a Rambo-like delivery that went something like, "let's go hunt some orc". Of course there's always Liv Tyler's performance (or lack thereof) as Arwen, but thankfully it was short and mainly done in the Elvish language. But, like I've already said, these are minor and not too distracting from the overall tone and epic grandeur of this breathtaking production. Purist fans may find that this is not exactly like the book, but one must also remember that this is Hollywood and that the tales are filtered through the lens of Jackson's camera.

Speaking of Jackson's camera, did I mention how exquisite each and every shot is? This is a virtual feast for the senses with such masterful use of special effects that one does not know where the effects always begin or end. Faces turn demonic in the blink of an eye, smoke rings turn into sky sailing schooners and there's always some sort of detail lurking in the scenery. The ring-wraiths are done up as anonymous black riders, evoking shades of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse, tapping the archetypal pool of fear that lurks in man's soul. The demonic Balrog was just that, demonic to the extreme, breathing fire and thunder like it were oxygen. Massive armies of video nasties wielding swords and whizzing arrows. Cathedral-like caverns that go as far as the eye can see and Hobbit holes that look exactly like you might have imagined them.

Perhaps the aspect of the film that I like best is that Peter Jackson and crew managed to make the tale leap off the page and from the imagination right there onto the screen. Ian McKellan as Gandalf was the perfect fit for the sorcerer's role, looking and acting just like what I always imagined Gandalf would look like. The performances of Elijah Wood (Frodo Baggins) and Ian Holm (Bilbo Baggins) were dead on as well. In fact, short of Liv Tyler's performance, I was stunned by every role. Perhaps this is the best job of casting in a movie that I have ever seen.

As far as relevant subject matter, well, what more does a Dagobert's Revenge reader want from a movie than sophisticated uses of traditional runic alphabets, recurring bloodlines and re-established monarchies? And was that a Masonic grip that I thought I saw Gandalf give to Bilbo Baggins when they last departed?

If you have still not seen the film or even read the book then you should. The book literally re-invented the fantasy genre, transforming it from mainly pulp fiction status to a literary art form with many pale imitators. While I will save space by not giving a synopsis of the plot, I will say that it is perhaps one of the best uses of archetypal symbolism within literature in the last century and is a tale that is destined to live within humanity's memory for quite some time, especially now that it resides on the silver screen.

In the meantime, I am patiently awaiting the second and third installments in the series and you should be too.

Buy Lord Of The Rings - The Fellowship Of The Ring on DVD at amazon.com.


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Lucifer Rising, 1973
Kenneth Anger’s short art film about a modern Crowleyan magician opening up a portal to ancient Egypt. UFOs invade in the final scene, representing an occurrence on the set of the film, reportedly. Stars Marianne Faithful, with a score by Manson family murderer Bobby Beausoleil.
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The Magic Flute, 1978
Ingmar Bergman’s bizarre stage production of Mozart’s last composition, which was based on the mysteries of Freemasonry.

Buy The Magic Flute on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Magician
Rex Ingram’s silent film about a character that is obviously based on Aleister Crowley. A strange demonic statue in the film resembles the statue of Asmodeus in the church at Rennes-le-Chateau.

Buy The Magician at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Man Who Would Be King, 1975
Sean Connery and Michael Caine are two Freemasons who set out to take over an obscure tribe in Kafristan last conquered by Alexander the Great, whom the tribesmen worshipped as a god. Soon Connery becomes an object of worship by the tribe, who believe him to be a reincarnation of Alexander because the Masonic medallion hanging about his neck - a square and compass surrounding the All-Seeing Eye - matches a symbol that Alexander himself had introduced to the tribe so many years previous. Adapted from the novel by Freemason Rudyard Kipling.

Buy The Man Who Would Be King on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Minion, 1998
A low-budget, straight-to-video horror film about the Beast of the Apocalypse being unleashed from the Bottomless Pit, where he has been imprisoned for the last 1000 years, the entrance to which is behind a steel door in a Templar preceptory in Jerusalem. This Preceptory, according to the story, still houses the Knights Templar, dedicated to preserving this terrible secret. When the Devil’s assistant, the Minion manages to escape the Pit, he immediately sets about trying to find the key to the Bottomless Pit, which just so happens to be inside of a Native American statuette buried underneath the subway in New York City, having been brought to America by Templar explorers centuries ago. Now it is up to a lone Templar and a female archeologist to stop the Minion, with the help of the archeologist’s Native American family. You know how good those Injuns are with spiritual stuff.

Buy The Minion at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Ninth Gate, 1999
Polanski returns to the topic of demonology with this tale of a rare book finder who is hired to search for a book written by Lucifer himself that instructs readers on how to summon him. The main character (played by Johnny Depp) must combat a Satanic cover to get his hands on it, with the help of a beautiful demoness, who seems to embody the concept of the Whore of Babylon. The ending leaves no doubt as to what side Polanski’s on in the Good vs. Evil debate.

Buy The Ninth Gate on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Order
Review by Kopavi Lyou

A young volatile priest named Alex is called upon by the "Theosophic division" of the Vatican to investigate his mentor's peculiar death. This stud of a priest (played by Heath Ledger) is trained in exorcism, bears the title of "the last of the Carolingians", and is uncannily reminiscent of Berenger Sauniere. When in a conversation about his service to the church he replies, "To serve? It's knowledge I'm after." As soon as his inquiry begins, Alex becomes completely absorbed in the dark world his rouge-priest mentor was privy to: a brother and sister pair of demons, secret parchments, an occult order, an initiation handed down through the ages, conspiracy within the church, and of course, murder.

Despite these groovy elements, the characters are hollow. I laughed and rolled my eyes at the uncomfortable silences that plague the move throughout.But what we have here is a story of a spiritual yet conflicted man who is convinced to "look into the abyss", where, he is told "there are wonders." There are some cool quotes, the most notable of all made in the coolest scene of the movie. In it, an oracle speaks: "From the stone which all is built [ shall you find] the key to the kingdom of heaven." Nice.

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Orpheus
An ancient myth with a modern spin (modern for the 1930s, that is). Cocteau presents the story of a poet who enters the Underworld through a portal and falls in love with Death. Key scenes of Orpheus receiving messages of nonsensical poetry from a magic car radio indicate that Cocteau himself received inspiration for his art from a similarly “unseen” force or organization, perhaps the Priory of Sion.

Buy Orpheus at amazon.com.


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Peggy Sue Got Married, 1986
Believe it or not, this film actually does pertain to Freemasonry in a small way. When Peggy Sue slips through a time loop and ends up in her 16-year-old body from 25 years previous, the only way back to her real time involves a magical ceremony performed by her grandfather’s Masonic lodge.

Buy Peggy Sue Got Married on DVD at amazon.com> or amazon.ca.


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Perceval, 1978
French Director Eric Rohmer’s opera-like interpretation of the Chretian de Troyes version of the Grail romance, with large portions of the plot advanced by singing.

Buy Perceval on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Pi, 1998
A mathematical genius searches for a sequence pattern that can predict the behavior of the stock market, and discovers it in the never-ending decimals of 3.14... His research takes an ugly turn when it catches the interest of a secret society of Jewish cabbalists, who hunt him down for the sacred knowledge between his ears.

Buy Pi on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981
The first Indiana Jones flick, about trying to find the Lost Ark of the Covenant, one of the main prizes of Templars and Freemasons, before Hitler does. Director Spielberg admits to inserting subliminal Masonic symbols into the background of the picture.

Buy Raiders of the Lost Ark on DVD at amazon.com.

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Revelation, 2001
From Romulus Films and Cyclops Vision Productions comes one of the first, and certainly one of the best fiction films based on the mystery of Rennes-le-Chateau. Revelation centers around a sacred object called the “Loculus” - a small box plated in gold and covered with occult symbols, containing a secret that appears to pertain to alchemy. This secret was preserved by the Knights Templar until the Loculus was stolen, apparently by the Vatican, and secreted away, apparently at Rennes-le-Chateau. Now a wealthy Englishman has assembled a stellar team of the world’s best experts in all fields of math, science, history, and esoterica, including his own son, a cryptologist, in an attempt to discover the secret of the Loculus. I have only seen the first 15 minutes on a promotional DVD, so I cannot spoil the ending for you, but a heart-pounding, suspenseful mystery, with lots of intrigue, murder and chase scenes promises to follow. The casting of The Kingdom’s Terrence Stamp as one of the villains is an extra-special treat. Visit http://www.revelation-movie.com for updated information.
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Rosemary’s Baby, 1968
Roman Polanski’s masterpiece about the woman who gives birth to the Anti-Christ, and the conspiracy to impregnate her with the Devil’s seed. Her character was called “Rosemary” after the title traditionally given to female witches who are chosen by covens to carry the child of their horned deity. Anton LaVey worked as a consultant on the film.

Buy Rosemary’s Baby on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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The Seventh Seal, 1957
Ingmar Bergman has admitted that all of his movies contain Masonic symbolism, but this movie contains it most explicitly. It pertains to a Templar knight who plays a game of chess with Death while discussing the meaninglessness of existence with him.

Buy Atlantis on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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She, 1935
Based on the H. Rider Haggard novel. Leo Vincy receives instructions from his dying uncle to mount an expedition to the Russian Arctic region in search of “The Flame”, a mystical fire of pure radiation that bestows immortality upon those who pass through it. This flame had, according to legend, been discovered by his ancestor John Vincy some 500 years ago, and he had never returned . This ancestor also bears an uncanny likeness to Leo. Leo discovers this fire in the underground city of Kor, ruled with severity by an uncompromising, deathless queen names She, who has been awaiting the return of John Vincy, her long-lost mortal lover, for 500 years. When Leo appears seeking the Flame, she believes him to be John’s reincarnation, and tries to entrap him into staying with her. This film is great as it is obviously based on the myths of the Venusberg, the Hollow Earth, and the Hyperborean Paradise.
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Skulls, 2000
A young an trying to get ahead at a prestigious law school learns the meaning of true brotherhood when his best friend is murdered by his brethren at the “Skulls” society (based on Yale’s “Skull & Bones Society”, which has included three U.S. Presidents, and most of the masterminds behind the creation of the CIA.) The main character is asked to keep quiet about the incident, and allow the Skulls to arrange the success of his future law career, or reveal what he knows, and die. He chooses a third option, and conspiratorial intrigue ensues.

Buy Skulls on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Stigmata, 1999
A girl afflicted with Stigmata channels a lost apocryphal gospel that has been kept secret by a Vatican conspiracy. This gospel is then found by a priest underneath the floor of his church. sound like the Sauniere story? It may, in fact, be based on it.

Buy Stigmata on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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Testament of Orpheus, 1960
Cocteau’s best, most important, and most misunderstood film. It provides an allegorical testimony of his life, his innermost secrets (which should be of great importance to all Dagobert’s Revenge readers), and clues to the meaning of the symbolism encoded into his other movies and artwork. Includes Cameo appearances from Pablo Picasso and Brigitte Bardot, whom we speculate to have been fellow members of the Priory of Sion.

Buy Testament of Orpheus at amazon.com.


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Tribulation 99: Alien Anomalies Under America, 1992
Craig Baldwin has assembled clips from a number of old sci-fi films and newsreels to tell the story of the aliens from the dying planet Quetzlcoatl (the name of the Aztec sun./sea god), who flee to Earth and burrow underneath the crust, staying there for centuries. Then in the 1950’s, enraged by our underground atomic testing, they strike back, resulting in a covert war between the aliens and the United States secret government, headed by the CIA. The plot manages to encapsulate just about every conspiracy theory you’ve ever heard, as well as some that you might have not.
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The Wicker Man, 1973
A police goes to Summer Isle, off the coast of England, to investigate a missing child, only to discover an entire community completely dominated by an amoral, bloodthirsty cult of Druidic pagans, who are plotting to sacrifice the girl on Mayday, placing her inside a giant effigy called “The Wicker Man”, which is then set on fire. Little does he know the joke’s on him.

Buy The Wicker Man on DVD at amazon.com or amazon.ca.


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