Book Review

The Philadelphia Experiment Murder: Parallel Universes and the Physics of Insanity

by Alexandra "Chica" Bruce

The ever-growing Montauk Project mythos continues on full force into the new millennium with the latest installment to the Sky Book series courtesy of Alexandra "Chica" Bruce, who blows her own unique riff on the theme in The Philadelphia Experiment Murder: Parallel Universes and the Physics of Insanity.

Much of The Philadelphia Experiment Murder concerns the late Phil Schneider, who before his untimely demise traveled the UFO and patriot lecture circuit in the early 90's exposing various conspiracies, among these allegations of a secret pact between the alien grays and the U.S. Government, which consisted of the trading of human genetic material for the latest and greatest in alien high tech. Schneider became privy to these clandestine activities while working on top secret projects for the government under civilian contract. Purportedly, Schneider helped construct tunnels into the earth, which connected a series of secret underground bases where aliens and humans participated in assorted hyjinks, including the back engineering of alien craft, time travel projects and alien/human hybrid genetic experimentation. Phil was probably one of the first (if not the first) to speak out on the Dulce War, a fabled alien/human underground battle, featuring laser guns and big-nosed grays. Allegedly, Phil was at the forefront of this legendary skirmish, kicking ass and taking alien names. While many may scoff at such far-flung assertions, Chica exhorts us not to throw out the alien baby with the bathwater, but instead to entertain a whole spectrum of possibilities, including not only the wild and wooly stories circulated by Phil Schneider, but as well an assortment of other mind-bending speculations concerning alternate dimensions and parallel worlds influencing and interacting with our own.

In The Philadelphia Experiment Murder, Chica suggests that Schneider's death went far beyond a garden variety suicide, and more likely than not was aided and abetted by those shadowy members of that arcane fraternity more commonly known in the annals of conspiracy lore as the "New World Order"-or in another dimension, the dreaded "Illuminaughty". In this regard, Schneider joins a long list of other supposed victims of this international cartel of creeps who pull the world's strings from behind the scenes, manipulating human beings to further the New World Odor's nefarious agenda.

In the final analysis, Chica's journey into the arcane territories of the Montauk Project, The Dulce War, and the very nature of reality is--in essence--a journey of self discovery, as in the epilogue she waxes poetic upon the potential pitfalls of falling prey to the prevalent consensus reality tunnels that mire our everyday existence. Furthermore, Chica makes some quite salient points about "conspiracy theories" that mirror many of my own feelings about the conspiracy research scene, such as it is. You see, conspiracies are a means of expanding consciousness, in my opinion, just like certain hallucinogens or extreme Tantric sex can catapult the cerebellum to higher forms of awareness and inner revelations. And this, methinks, is Chica's ultimate pursuit in writing this book (if I may be so bold): to entrain her own brain to higher frequencies and ultimately groove to those very same vibrations which are there for us all, whether we wish to take advantage of them or not.

Like a Zen master who coaches in the NBA--or in another reality washes dishes in the silent perfection of his own mind--we all have own realities to make, where ever we may be existing in the known (or unknown) Universe. The Montauk mythology is but one of many mantras that can be riffed upon in this unified field theory of high weirdness, more commonly referred to as "reality".

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